Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California Blogger Blogspot

40 year old Vegan rapper Chokeules. Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California

40 year old Vegan rapper Chokeules.

Hi there, I’m a vegan rapper from Toronto, I just put out a video for my new song “40-Year-Old Vegan” and it’s been getting a great response, so I just wanted to keep spreading the word…

Here’s the youtube link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n-SfgK3ITc

And Huffington Post link as well:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/10/15/40-year-old-vegan_n_5991950.html

From the album Stay Up available here: http://handsolorecords.bandcamp.com/a…

Video by Dan Jardine (@deanofdanger) for Boom Shoal Enterprises (@boomshoal). https://www.facebook.com/boomshoal

Special thanks to all the people & animals at Wishing Well Sanctuary. For more info, or to volunteer/donate, visithttp://www.wishingwellsanctuary.org/

Chokeules – 40-Year-Old Vegan (Produced by Savilion, Cuts by DJiRATE.)

40-Year-Old Vegan video produced/directed/edited by Dan Jardine.

http://danieljardine.com/
http://chokeules.com/

follow choke on everything: @chokeules

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Arrest made in opossum cruelty case. Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California

Opossum, possum, Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates, Los Angeles, California

Arrest made in Santa Cruz pizzeria perished possum case

POSTED: 12:35 PM PDT Oct 10, 2014

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. –
Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter officials say a 31-year-old man has been arrested in connection with an opossum that died after being doused with bleach at a pizzeria.

The animal shelter has been investigating a report that an employee at South Beach Pizza in Santa Cruz poured bleach on the marsupial last weekend.

A fellow employee brought the baby animal to a wildlife rescue center for treatment but it later died, officials said.

Alan Thomas Rockwood of Santa Cruz was charged on Thursday with one count of cruelty to animals, and later released. Animal shelter officials say Rockwood confessed to pouring bleach on the animal on Oct. 4.

Officials say Rockwood allegedly poured bleach on it in an attempt to kill it after it became trapped in a trashcan outside the Beach Street business.

A necropsy was conducted at the Animal Shelter and a veterinarian determined the animal died of pneumonia. The animals’ lungs were sent for microscopic examination of the tissue to find evidence of bleach. The toxicology report is pending.

Please, send an email to  Bob Lee, District Attorney, County of Santa Cruz to let them know you want this person prosecuted. Use the info below or use their online form here
https://datinternet.co.santa-cruz.ca.us/index.php/contactusquick

701 Ocean Street, Rm. 200
Santa Cruz, CA 95060

E-mail: dao@co.santa-cruz.ca.us
Telephone: (831) 454-2400

Here’s a sample email. Feel free to personalize it.

“I deeply care about our native wildlife and will always stand up for their proper treatment. I urge you to prosecute this opossum killer to the fullest extent of the law.

Many people don’t understand wildlife behavior and kill innocent animals due to unfounded fears. Opossums are shy creatures with few defenses. The baby opossum in this case was trapped in a trashcan and doused with full-concentration bleach, which is extremely toxic.

Fortunately, the Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter arrested the employee responsible for pouring bleach on the opossum. Now, I’m asking you to prosecute this wildlife killer and push for the maximum sentence possible. I don’t want this baby opossum to have died in vain. I’m counting on you to do the right thing and uphold the law to send a strong message against animal cruelty.”

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Bat Conservation International verses Bat World Sanctuary – Two very different organizations in Texas

Bat Conservation International http://www.batcon.org is very different than Bat World Sanctuary. Some people who aren’t familiar with bats get them confused because Bat World copies and mimics everything that Bat Conservation International does. They do this to skim donations, members, attention, traffic and to help their image. While these two organizations could not be more different I will explain the differences here.

Bat Conservation International was started in 1982 in Austin, Texas by Dr. Merlin Tuttle. They have a staff of 30 biologists who have PhDs in over 60 countries. They bring in about $4.7 million in donations per year. Here is their Guidestar http://www.guidestar.org/organizations/74-2553144/bat-conservation-international.aspx They have a five star rating and are a gold member. The largest bat colony in the world in Bracken Cave is located on their property. They give tours and are permitted to show bats to the public. They have $4.2M in assets. They started “BATS” magazine in 1983. http://batcon.org/resources/media-education/bats-magazine

Bat World Sanctuary was started in 1994 in Mineral Wells, Texas by Amanda Lollar who has not gone past the eighth grade. Amanda is the only person on payroll even though she states the organization is all volunteer. They bring in $350K, have no star rating and have no member status. http://www.guidestar.org/organizations/75-2503642/bat-world-sanctuary.aspx They spend most of their money on attorney fees. They do not have a bat colony on their property. They are prohibited from giving tours or showing bats because they have had repeat violations of the law and regulations. They have maybe $75K in assets. They started “BAT WORLD” magazine in 2009. It is an exact copy of BCI’s magazine in every single way, i.e. size, paper, font, articles, format… http://batworld.org/online-magazine/

It’s very clear that Amanda Lollar of Bat World is extremely jealous of BCI. Lollar actually told me June 2010 that she does all the work and BCI gets all the donations and credit when they don’t save any bats at all. Lollar was very upset by this and said it’s very unfair. Lollar then told me she hoped to get bats with white nose syndrome so she could tell the world and get donations. For over a year Lollar took repeat hole punches out of bats’ wings to send to the lab for testing. Lollar is so uneducated that she did not realize that bats that migrate don’t get WNS. 99.99% of the bats at Bat World are migratory Brazilian/Mexican free-tail bats. Bat World attacks almost all other bat organizations in the world. She also attacks Universities, bat researchers and other bat rescuers.

BCI is a good organization who has done so much to help bats. Bat World is small petty organization that harms more bats than they help. If you’re thinking of donating money to a bat organization this Halloween, donate to BCI. Your money will truly help bats.

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

San Antonio agrees to save the Bracken bat caves in Texas, Bat Conservation International, Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates

Bat Conservation International
San Antonio votes YES to Save the Cave!

For the past two years, BCI supporters have stepped forward to protect Bracken Bat Cave, the largest colony of bats in the world! Thanks to their help, today the City of San Antonio voted to invest $5 million to help acquire 1,520 acres of open space adjacent to BCI’s Preserve. This historic decision puts us within reach of purchasing the entire tract of land and protecting the habitat Bracken’s bats have used for thousands of years.
Together with our partners, including The Nature Conservancy, BCI promised to raise private contributions to complete the transaction. BCI’s goal is $8 million and we are over halfway there!
Please celebrate Halloween 2014 with a gift to the bats. You can help Save the Cave by donating to BCI at www.SaveTheCave.US .

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Rabid bats in the United States – Texas has more rabid bats than any other state in the US

Most rabid bats in the United States are in Texas. As you can see from the map the main areas which have rabid bats are in Texas where the main bat colonies are located. 23% of all rabid animals in 2010 were bats numbering 1,430. Bats are the most likely wild animal to give someone rabies in the United States. The main reason is because bats teeth are very small and most people don’t realize they’ve been bitten. In 2010 two people contracted rabies both from bats. In the past 20 years the main cause of rabies transmission to humans is via bats. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html
Bat, bats, rabies, rabid, Texas, Wetherford, Parker, Mineral Wells, Bat World Sanctuary

80% of the rabid bats in Texas are Brazilian free-tail aka Mexican free-tail. Brazilian bats have the second highest positivity rate. Bats were found to be most likely to pass rabies to humans and other animals such as cats, dogs and cows.

The image below shows when rabid bats are found. As you can see there are more rabid bats found when they have migrated to Texas and are mating, having babies and rearing their young. The most common rabid bat the Brazilian free-tail aka Mexican free-tail arrives in Texas around April to mate. They give birth starting June 15 or so. They migrate back to South America generally by October or so. Notice the steep drop in rabies when bats start to migrate back to South America.

Rabid, rabies, bat, bats, texas, bat world sanctuary,
The image below shows the places most likely to have rabid bats. The four “x” are bat colonies which arrive in Texas every year to mate and give birth. Notice the larger cluster above the four main bat colonies. That is Mineral Wells, Texas where Bat World Sanctuary is located. There are many rabid bats here because of Bat World Sanctuary housing and supporting a wild colony of bats. She was instructed to exclude bats from her building but refused. Amanda Lollar of Bat World Sanctuary went so far as to state that Brazilian bats are rare and protected when they are not. She also threatened to sue the City of Mineral Wells. The Baker Hotel which is boarded up is also located in Mineral Wells, Texas.

Bat, bats, rabies, brazilian free-tail, Bat World Sanctuary, rabid, Texas

74% of the dead and dying bats found at Bat World Sanctuary in Mineral Wells, Texas tested positive for rabies. This is the highest percentage of rabid bats ever tested in the United States.

Bat World Sanctuary, Amanda Lollar, rabid, rabies, bat, bats, positive, Mineral Wells, Texas, Wetherford

September 28, 2014 is World Rabies Day when we educate people about bats. Remember, never touch a bat with your bare hand. If a bat touched, scratched or bit you, contact your physician for treatment.

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Saturday, October 4, 2014

How to humanely deter unwanted wildlife – Mary Cummins, Animal Advocates

Who’s who of Southern California wildlife (and how to keep them away)

By MICHELLE HOFMANN LA Times

Encounters with wildlife are not rare, even for L.A. city slickers
For a city slicker or a nature lover, a wildlife encounter can be alarming. Ann Bryant, executive director of the BEAR League (www.savebears.org), a Lake Tahoe-based nonprofit whose name stands for Bear Education, Aversion, Response, fields about 25 calls from panicked tourists and residents for every one call to Fish and Wildlife officials in her area. “People don’t know what to do,” she said.

Carol Singleton, a marketing specialist for the state’s Department of Fish and Wildlife and program coordinator for the Keep Me Wild campaign (www.keepmewild.com), said homeowners can avoid a lot of wildlife problems with a little common sense and education.

“People don’t understand the harm they inflict by feeding wild animals,” she said. Moreover, if you’re feeding deer and smaller animals (raccoons) on a regular basis, there’s a higher chance of a mountain lion entering your property, she added.

To play it safe, put away bird and squirrel feeders nightly. Don’t leave pets or pet food outside overnight. Cover compost piles. Remove excess fruit from the trees and the ground. Seal trash cans. Search for and seal any access points before the spring breeding season. Cover or remove open water sources (Jacuzzis, bird baths and fish ponds). Secure farm enclosures. Install perimeter fencing and motion-sensitive exterior lights. Minimize hiding places, trim shrubbery and add deer-resistant landscaping.

A who’s who of Southern California wildlife

What follows is a quick look at some of the wildlife we might encounter in Southern California:

Coyotes

Average life span in the wild: Up to 14 years

Weight: 20 to 50 pounds

Fast facts: Adaptable and smart, coyotes — members of the dog family — travel solo and in groups. From insects and fruit, to deer and small pets (and that feral cat colony your neighbor keeps feeding), coyotes will eat almost anything. What should you do if you see a coyote? Make loud noises. Throw something in the animal’s direction. They are not protected and can be killed by exterminators.

Mountain lions

Average life span in the wild: 12 years

Weight: Males, 110 to 160 pounds; females, 80 to 110 pounds.

Fast facts: Mountain lions are solitary and elusive, which means they typically avoid people (attacks on humans are rare). They can often be identified by the black-tipped tail and ears. (Bobcats have a short tail and are slightly bigger than a house cat.) Their diet includes deer and smaller animals (birds, coyotes, livestock, opossums, porcupines and raccoons). If you encounter a mountain lion that does not run away, make noise, speak loudly, raise and wave your arms or throw something. Don’t crouch or turn your back to the animal to run. California mountain lions are a specially protected species.

Raccoons

Average life span in the wild: Two to three years

Weight: 14 to 23 pounds

Fast facts: These masked bandits are adaptable, dexterous and everywhere. They are nocturnal and omnivorous, eating rats, gophers, mice, rabbits, squirrels, insects, pet food, fruit, plants and almost anything they can find in your trash. Truly opportunistic, a raccoon will live in a fallen log, a tree cavity or your attic. Don’t corner them, threaten their young or try to handle them. If you see a raccoon, you can try to frighten them with noises or turning on the lights. If that doesn’t work, you might need to call a trapper.

Skunks

Average life span in the wild: Three years

Weight: 6 to 14 pounds

Fast facts: Skunks are black and white and best known for their horrible-smelling spray, an oily liquid produced by glands under their large tails. But healthy skunks spray only when threatened, and before spraying, a skunk will hiss, stamp its feet and lift its tail. They are primarily solitary animals, nocturnal foragers that eat a variety of insects that can be deadly to man (black widow spiders and scorpions, for instance), along with plants and fruits, rodents, worms and small animals. Skunks will nest in hollow logs, tree cavities and buildings. If you encounter a skunk, speak in a low voice, stamp your feet, shine a light. And good luck.

Mule deer

Average life span in the wild: Seven to 10 years

Weight: Males, 110 to 300 pounds; females, 95 to 200 pounds

Fast facts: Considered protected game, this herbivore eats a variety of plants, including fruits, fungi, grass, leaves, twigs and nuts. Deer can get their antlers caught in swing sets and fences and damage property. Madeline Bernstein, president of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles, came home one night to find a deer banging its head on her son’s bedroom window frantically. She called her office and asked for help.

“They said, ‘Turn the light off. He’s seeing another deer in the reflection.’ And as soon as I turned the light off, the deer calmed down,” she said.

Mule deer, which are prey for bobcats, mountain lions and coyotes, are mainly nocturnal or crepuscular, venturing out at dusk and dawn. To access a free PDF of the Gardener’s Guide to Preventing Deer Damage, visit www.keepmewild.com and select “mule deer.”

Black bears

Average life span in the wild: 20 years

Weight: 200 to 600 pounds

Fast facts: The intelligent, solitary black bear naturally fears people and keeps its distance. But like most bright creatures, bears find it hard to resist a free meal. They aren’t fussy.

They occasionally attack. Last month, a Carpinteria woman was attacked by a 300-pound bear while she was walking her dogs in an avocado grove; she survived.

It’s illegal to intentionally feed bears (punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine). To prevent problems, never feed bears or any other wildlife. Secure your trash. If you encounter a bear, don’t run. Black bears can travel fast over short distances. Face the animal. Make noise. Wave your arms and try to appear as large as possible. For questions about bears, visit www.savebears.org, call the BEAR League at (530) 525-7297 or call Fish and Wildlife at (858) 467-4201.

If you witness a wild animal attack, call 911. To report a coyote or mountain lion, call the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Natural Resource Volunteer Program (www.dfg.ca.gov/volunteer/NRVP) at (858) 467-4201.

Sources: California Department of Fish and Wildlife, nationalgeographic.com, the BEAR League, Urban Wildlife Trapping Experts.

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Animal Advocates’ pumpkin seed campaign for Halloween! – Mary Cummins, Los Angeles, California

Animal Advocates’ pumpkin seed campaign for Halloween, Mary Cummins, Los Angeles, California

Animal Advocates generally buys nuts and seeds to feed to some of our wildlife. We recently discovered that it takes an awful lot of water to grow nuts and seeds. Most nuts are grown in California where we have a horrible drought. We must do everything we can to save water.

Keeping with our goal of being as eco-friendly as we can, we’ve decided to collect the seeds from Halloween pumpkins. Most people throw these seeds into the trash or green recycling bin. Our goal is to save money on animal food, feed our wildlife and keep the seeds out of landfills. It’s a win win win situation for Animal Advocates, wildlife and the environment.

When you carve your Halloween pumpkins we’d like to ask you to save the seeds for us. We will then clean and bake them so we can feed them to our animals. I will give more detailed information on how we will collect them in the next two weeks. If you can put them in a bag in your freezer to save them for us, that’d be great. I will figure out a way for us to collect them or a place where people can drop them off.

If you live too far away to give us the seeds, you can give them to your local wildlife rehabilitation facilities. There is a list here.

http://www.mary.cc/How%20To%20Locate%20a%20Wildlife%20Rehabilitator.html

If there is no rehab facility near you, here’s a recipe so you can bake them yourself and eat them.

  • Clean the pumpkin seeds to remove all bits of pumpkin flesh. I clean them in a collander.
  • Put clean seeds in a bowl
  • Add a tiny bit of oil of your choice and salt to your taste
  • Mix the seeds well in the bowl so they are all evenly coated with oil and salt
  • Preheat oven to 300 degrees
  • Place seeds in a single layer on a cookie sheet or something similar. You can spray the sheet with Pam if you didn’t use oil with the seeds.
  • Bake for 45 minutes or until they turn golden brown
  • Remove, cool and enjoy them!

Thanks so much from everyone at Animal Advocates!

http://www.AnimalAdvocates.us
http://www.facebook.com/AnimalAdvocatesUSA

Mary Cummins of Animal Advocates is a wildlife rehabilitator licensed by the California Department of Fish and Game and the USDA. Mary Cummins is also a licensed real estate appraiser in Los Angeles, California.

Google+ Mary Cummins, Mary K. Cummins, Mary Katherine Cummins, Mary Cummins-Cobb, Mary, Cummins, Cobb, wildlife, wild, animal, rescue, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife rehabilitator, fish, game, los angeles, california, united states, squirrel, raccoon, fox, skunk, opossum, coyote, bobcat, manual, instructor, speaker, humane, nuisance, control, pest, trap, exclude, deter, green, non-profit, nonprofit, non, profit, ill, injured, orphaned, exhibit, exhibitor, usda, united states department of agriculture, hsus, humane society, peta, ndart, humane academy, humane officer, animal legal defense fund, animal cruelty, investigation, peace officer, animal, cruelty, abuse, neglect #marycummins #animaladvocates #losangeles #california #wildlife #wildliferehabilitation #wildliferehabilitator #realestate #realestateappraiser #realestateappraisal #lawsuit

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About Mary Cummins Animal Advocates Real Estate Appraiser

Mary Cummins is President of Animal Advocates. She is licensed with the California Department of Fish & Game, USDA and the City of Los Angeles to rescue and rehabilitate wildlife. Cummins speaks to local community groups and students about respecting wildlife and humane wildlife control. She is also a Humane Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator. She has written manuals on small mammal rehabilitation besides numerous articles. She was born and raised in Southern California. She attended Beverly Hills Good Shepherd Catholic School and Beverly Hills High School. Besides being a member of Junior Mensa and on the Dean's list, she was a top ten national swimmer and competed on the men's water polo team. She began college at the age of 15 attending the University of Southern California on scholarship, majoring in Psychology/Sociology. After college Cummins became a licensed real estate agent specializing in income property in Los Angeles. She obtained her real estate appraisal license, real estate brokerage license and currently does real estate consulting, expert witness testimony and review appraisals at Cummins Real Estate Services.
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